Composition and Rhetoric People

Faculty

Michael Bernard-DonalsMICHAEL BERNARD-DONALS

Professor of English and Jewish Studies

Vice Provost for Faculty and Staff

michael.bernarddonals@wisc.edu

6187A Helen C. White Hall

 

Caroline Gottschalk Druschke

CAROLINE GOTTSCHALK DRUSCHKE

Assistant Professor

Faculty Affiliate, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies

caroline.gottschalk. druschke@wisc.edu

6183 Helen C. White Hall

 

MARY FIORENZA

Faculty Associate

Associate Director, English 100

fiorenza@wisc.edu

6187B Helen C. White Hall

 

Brad Hughes

BRAD HUGHES

Director, The Writing Center & Writing Across the Curriculum

bthughes@wisc.edu

6187F Helen C. White

 

 

Christa J. Olson

CHRISTA J. OLSON

Associate Professor

Director of English 201-Intermediate Composition

christa.olson@wisc.edu

6187d Helen C. White Hall

 

 

MORRIS YOUNG

Professor of English

Director of English 100

Affiliate, Asian American Studies

msyoung4@wisc.edu

6187C Helen C. White Hall

 

 

 

KATE VIEIRA

Associate Professor

Faculty, Language Sciences and Second Language Acquisition

Faculty Affiliate in Latin American, Caribbean, and Iberian Studies

kevieira@wisc.edu

Michael Bernard-Donals is the Nancy Hoefs Profess of English and an affiliate member of the Mosse/Weinstein Center for Jewish Studies.  While his recent work has focused on the intersections of rhetoric, memory, and ethics, he has also written and taught courses in the history of rhetoric, contemporary rhetorical theory, and the relation of visual and spatial rhetoric in the built environment.  With an appointment in the provost’s office, he is also interested in how rhetoric functions as part of higher education’s contract with the public, and how rhetoric’s capacity to move has implications for the position and status of rhetors (and rhetoricians) in the academic marketplace.

In her research, teaching, and outreach, Caroline Gottschalk Druschke works to bring together her interests and training across rhetorical studies, gender and women’s studies, and the environmental sciences. Caroline enjoys teaching and advising undergraduate and graduate students in the realms of community-based research, rhetoric of science, postcritical theory, and writing across the curriculum, but works to encourage students to pursue their own interests and passions. With a suite of interdisciplinary collaborators and funded projects focused on dam decision-making, wild trout conservation, science communication, and STEM writing, Caroline tries to involve students in active projects and bring them into a network of like-minded (and not like-minded!) collaborators.

Mary Fiorenza teaches undergraduate courses in composition and creative writing. Long-standing interests revolve around writing pedagogy, writing as a practice, writing and daily life, and the overlaps in creative writing and composition. In her administrative role with English 100, Mary mentors graduate student writing teachers, which is a constant source of inspiration for her own teaching, as is much of the big picture and daily work she enjoys with the program’s director and grad student assistant directors. Prospective graduate students, please note, she does not teach or advise in the graduate program.

Bradley Hughes is the Director of the University’s Writing Center and the Director of the University’s Writing Across the Curriculum Program. In these programs, Brad loves to collaborate with undergraduate- and graduate-student colleagues to support a strong culture of writing across campus. Brad’s current research—often done collaboratively with graduate students–focuses on tutor learning, on transfer, on international writing centers, on principles for developing and assessing writing centers, on threshold concepts in writing studies, and on faculty learning in WAC programs. Brad has recently received the International Writing Centers Association (IWCA) award for the best research article (twice in the past five years), the IWCA’s Muriel Harris Outstanding Service Award, and an award from the journal Kairos for the UW-Madison Writing Center’s blog, Another Word[writing.wisc.edu/blog].

Christa Olson is a rhetorical historian specializing in visual culture and hemispheric studies. Her enduring interest in how patterns of communication persist, spread, and change over time has led her to write about indigenous Ecuadorians’ strategies for evading forced labor, the stuff that U.S. soldiers sent home from the Mexican War, and Spanish-language literacy films produced by the Walt Disney Company (among other things). She has worked in archives from Quito, Ecuador to Madison Wisconsin and loves sharing the joys (and sorrows) of archival work with undergraduate and graduate students. As a teacher, Christa grounds her courses in local conditions, facilitating broad learning about writing, rhetoric, and research methods by starting (but not staying) close to home. She works with a wide range of graduate students and most values the collaborative project of writing and learning together.

Morris Young is Professor of English, Director of English 100, and faculty affiliate in Asian American Studies.  His research and teaching focus on the relationship between writing and identity, the intersections of literacy and rhetorical studies, and the emergence and production of Asian American literature and culture. Morris’s current research interests take up rhetorical space as both metaphor and material and how this shapes rhetorical activity in response to exigencies of exclusion, marginalization, and containment. His book, Minor Re/Visions: Asian American Literacy Narratives as a Rhetoric of Citizenship (2004) received the 2004 W. Ross Winterowd Award and the 2006 CCCC Outstanding Book Award. His co-edited collection (with LuMing Mao), Representations: Doing Asian American Rhetoric (2008), received honorable mention for the 2009 MLA Mina P. Shaughnessy Award.

Kate Vieira is an ethnographer whose research spans the United States, Eastern Europe, and Latin America, where she works with immigrants, transnational families, and community organizations. One central question drives of Kate’s research and teaching: What are the consequences of writing for the lives of ordinary people across the globe? You can read more about Kate’s projects and classes here: https://www.katevieira.com/

Current Graduate Students

Emily Bouza

Assistant Director of Writing Fellows

ebouza@wisc.edu

Antonio Byrd

PhD conferred 8/25/2019

aabyrd@wisc.edu

Kathleen Daly

PhD conferred 8/25/2019

kadaly@wisc.edu

Brandee Easter

PhD conferred 8/25/2019

English 100 Assistant Director

bdeaster@wisc.edu

Elisa Findlay

PhD conferred 8/25/2019

Assistant Director of Writing Fellows; Assistant Director of Madison Writing Assistance; Composition and Rhetoric Colloquium Graduate Coordinator

eafindlay@wisc.edu

Michael Haen

Writing Across the Curriculum Assistant Director

mhaen@wisc.edu

Jonathan Isaac

Assistant Director of Writing Across the Curriculum

isaac3@wisc.edu

Calley Marotta

Writing Fellows Assistant Director

camarotta@wisc.edu

Meg Marquardt

English 201 Assistant Director

mmarquardt3@wisc.edu

Tori Thompson Peters

English 100 Assistant Director

tlthompson5@wisc.edu

Kassia Shaw

English 201 Assistant Director

kshaw7@wisc.edu

Neil Simpkins

PhD conferred 8/25/2019

nsimpkins@wisc.edu

Brenna Swift

Assistant Director of Writing Fellows

blswift@wisc.edu