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Watch Professor Josh Calhoun talk about his Spring 2018 course, English 162: Why Shakespeare?


1184 Spring 2017-18 Course Descriptions

We have listed the numbers and titles of many of the English courses for the Fall 2017-18 semester below.

In addition, information about the undergraduate catalogue for English courses can be found in MyCourseGuide (NetID log-in required). Non-UW students can contact the Undergraduate Advisor for information about courses.


100: Introduction to College Composition
TA Taught courses
Times & Places Vary

English 100 is an introduction to college composition that begins to prepare students for the demands of writing in the university and for a variety of contexts beyond the classroom. Students will compose several shorter and longer essays totaling 25-30 pages of revised writing, develop critical reading and thinking skills and information literacy, and practice oral communication.

 

 

120: Introduction to Theatre and Dramatic Literature
Mary Trotter
MoWe 12:05-12:55 Humanities 3650
Prereqs: Open to freshman, 4 cr sections meet Com B requirement

 

English/Theatre and Drama 120 is an introductory course offered in two formats: a 3-credit option and a 4-credit Comm-B (writing-intensive) option. In both formats we read plays, attend performances, and think, talk, and write about plays and performances. 

This semester we will read about one play per week along with supplemental materials, covering a wide range of historical periods, cultural traditions, aesthetic theories and dramatic genres. You will also attend and write about at least one live performance. Playwrights will most likely include: Beckett, Glaspell, Hwang, Moliere, Parks, Shakespeare, Sophocles, Soyinka, Treadwell, Wilson, and Zeami.

Our course goals include: 

• To think about plays and performance in terms of the questions they pose about our identities and our world 

• To analyze selected dramatic texts as shaped by and shaping specific cultural, dramatic, and theatrical conditions 

• To investigate elements of performance in both theory and practice 

• To articulate informed responses to text and performance in both oral and written forms 

 

 

140: Comm B Topics in English Literature
Topic: Lost Selves and Forgotten Homes
Jeffrey Steele
TuTh 12:05-12:55pm Humanities 2650

A course on literature written in English that satisfies the Comm B requirement. Topic will vary by semester.

 

 

145: American Dreamers
David Zimmerman
TuTh 11:00-11:50am Birge 145

 

We'll be studying novels, plays, and films that focus on individuals who strive to achieve success and security in America. These individuals sometimes succeed, but in doing so they often compromise their power and freedom. They sometimes fail, exposing both the seductive promise and the fatal limitations of the American Dream. The course texts ask: What are the risks and rewards of the dream of success in America? How does our country's political and social history shape the meaning and possibility of success for different groups of people? Does success require that individuals fit in socially, and do individuals gain or lose power by assimilating? What role does mass culture play in shaping individuals' passion and potential for success? The course is meant to be engaging and fun. Our hope is that you will enjoy studying the texts and movies and also enjoy learning how to think critically and carefully about them and the questions they pose. The course texts include John Guare, Six Degrees of Separation; Edith Wharton, Ethan Frome; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Nella Larsen, Passing; Suzan-Lori Parks, Topdog/Underdog; Colson Whitehead, Zone One; Spike Lee, Bamboozled (film); Toni Morrison, A Mercy

 

 

150: Literature & Culture of Asian America
Christina Solomon
TuTh 2:30-3:45pm Ingraham 214

Course Catalog Description: Since the 19th century, "America" has often been defined by its relationship with "Asia," through cultural influence, immigration, imperialism, and war. This course traces the role of Asia and Asians in American literature and culture, from the Chinese and Japanese cultural influences that helped shape literary modernism to the rise of a distinctive culture produced by Asian immigrants to America and their descendants

162: Shakespeare
Joshua Calhoun
TuTh 9:55-10:45am Humanities 2650

Prereqs: Open to Freshman

Why Shakespeare? is an entry-level English course designed to introduce students from a variety of social, cultural, and disciplinary backgrounds to Shakespearean literature. Toward this end, the course also questions Shakespeare’s prominence in literature and culture. Is he really that good? Does our ongoing fascination with Shakespeare say more about him and his writing or about us, about our preferences, about our values?

We will begin the semester with readings from Shakespeare’s Sonnets, then we will set off on a journey into the various worlds Shakespeare conjured on stage. First, we will head to Ancient Greece for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, then we will journey to medieval Scotland (Macbeth), then on to fourteenth-century England for Henry IV, Part One. In this first unit, we will focus on “Form & Function” as we seek to understand how Shakespeare represents the world with language and actors—and how later artists represent Shakespeare’s representations with film.

Our second unit, “Lives & Afterlives,” will consider three of Shakespeare’s most well-known plays. Reading—or, for many of us, re-reading—Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, and Hamlet will give us a chance to think more actively about Shakespeare’s staying power in our popular imagination.

Assessments include two short essays plus a midterm and final exam. If we succeed as a class, students will finish the semester with a working understanding of Shakespearean language and themes that appear everywhere in literature and media (including graphic novels, film, music, children’s literature, etc.).

 

 

168: Modern Literature
Emily Auerbach
We 6:00-9:00pm TBA
Prereqs: Open to Freshman; Open to Odyssey Project students only

Course Catalog Description: A thematic introduction to literary works in a variety of genres written in English from the turn of the twentieth century to the present day. Emphasis may vary between writers from the U.S., Britain, Ireland, and other Anglophone nations.

172: Literatures of Native America
TBA
MoWeFr 9:55-10:45am TBA
Prereqs: Open to Freshman

 

Course Catalog Description: Introduction to the oral and written literatures of the peoples of native North America. An engagement with texts across historical periods, tribal groups, and regions to examine forms such as oratory, sermon, testimony, autobiography, and contemporary poetry and novels.

 

177: Literature and Popular Culture
Martin Foys
TuTh 9:55-10:45am Noland 132
Topic: Beowulf to Tolkien: the Medieval as Modern Fantasy

 

J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings series were the books that launched the modern fantasy genre. But Tolkien was also a brilliant Oxford scholar of medieval literature, and used medieval literature as the foundation for all of his fantasy creations.

This class will first explore Beowulf, the Old English epic poem of heroes, feuds and monsters, using Tolkien's own modern translation and others. We will also study the legacy of Beowulf today, through comic book, film and video game adaptations, as well as some other examples of medieval literature that inspired Tolkien (like chivalric romance).

We will then study the rise of modern fantasy through Tolkien's own theories of fantasy, looking at Victorian fantasy (Alice in Wonderland), the fantasy of Tolkien and his time, (The Hobbit, Narnia Chronicles), before ending with thinking about the state of popular fantasy today in books, film and television (Peter Jackson's films, J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series, and G.R.R. Martin's Game of Thrones series). During the course, we will tie our explorations to culturally relevant issues of past and present including: nationalism, the power of religion, effects of media and technology, social constructions of race and gender, the nostalgic production of the past, and the transformative nature of language.

 

182: Introduction to Literature for Honors
Martin Foys
TuTh 1:00-2:15pm Education L173
Topic: Tolkien, Beowulf and the Rise of Modern Fantasy
Prereqs: Open to Freshman, Honors program students only

J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings series were the books that launched the modern fantasy genre. But Tolkien was also a brilliant Oxford scholar of medieval literature, and used medieval literature as the foundation for all of his fantasy creations.

This class will first explore Beowulf, the Old English epic poem of heroes, feuds and monsters, using Tolkien's own modern translation and others. We will also study the legacy of Beowulf today, through comic book, film and video game adaptations, as well as some other examples of medieval literature that inspired Tolkien (like chivalric romance).

We will then study the rise of modern fantasy through Tolkien's own theories of fantasy, looking at Victorian fantasy (Alice in Wonderland), the fantasy of Tolkien and his time, (The Hobbit, Narnia Chronicles), before ending with thinking about the state of popular fantasy today in books, film and television (Peter Jackson's films, J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series, and G.R.R. Martin's Game of Thrones series). During the course, we will tie our explorations to culturally relevant issues of past and present including: nationalism, the power of religion, effects of media and technology, social constructions of race and gender, the nostalgic production of the past, and the transformative nature of language.

200: Writing Studio
TBA
We 5:30-7:00pm Chadbourne 126
Prereqs: Concurrent enrollment in another course where academic writing is assigned

Course Catalog Description: The focus is on students' own writing in this workshop-oriented course for writers in any discipline. Theoretical and practical foundations for drafting, revising, and reviewing a range of academic genres and approaches.

201: Intermediate Composition
TA Taught courses
Times & Places Vary
Prereqs: Communication A satisfied. Not open to Freshmen or auditors

 

English 201 is a small, topic-driven writing course that fulfills part B of the University’s Communication requirement. Sections of 201 offer hands-on practice with writing and revision, building on skills developed in earlier writing courses and providing new opportunities for students to grow as writers. Though topics vary by section and semester, this class consistently provides experience writing in multiple genres and for diverse audiences.

 

207: Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction & Poetry Workshop
TA taught courses
Times & Places Vary
Prereqs: 3 credits of literature; Open only to Sophomores only

In this course, students are taught the fundamental elements of craft in both fiction (plot, point of view, dialogue, and setting, etc.) and poetry (the image, the line, sound and meter, etc.). This class is taught as a workshop, which means class discussion will focus on both craft (published stories, poems, and essays) and, perhaps more importantly, the fiction and poetry written by each student. That is, the student writing becomes the text, and the instructor leads a sympathetic, but critical, discussion of the particular work at hand. Students should expect to read and comment on two or three published works per week as well as the work of their peers. To enable a collegial and productive class setting, all sections of 207 are capped at eighteen students.

 

214: The English Language
Richard F Young
MoWe 11:00-11:50am Van Vleck B130
Prereqs: Sophomore standing

 

Whether you have spoken English since you were a baby or you learned English as an adult, you probably have asked yourself some questions about the English language. Do you feel good or do you feel well? Who wrote the dictionary? Is hip-hop poetry? How do children learn to speak? Will the Internet really change the English language? In this class, we will ask many questions like these and attempt to answer them by using the techniques of modern linguistics (the scientific study of language). We will investigate how the English that we use today is organized into sounds, into small meaning-bearing units called morphemes, into words, and how words group together into sentences. Although most people have strong feelings about what is right and wrong about today's English, we will see that there is no such thing as ONE English language. No, there is no single English language today, and when we look back over the past 50 years or over the past 500 years it is obvious that English has changed. What processes have brought about this change? And why do different native speakers today speak different Englishes? This class is intended for anyone who is interested in how English works and how the English of today came to be what it is. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Schedule
Week 1: 'A Language Like English'
Week 2: 'Language and Authority'
Week 3: 'English Phonology'
Week 4: 'English Morphology'
Week 5: 'English Syntax: The Grammar of Words'
Week 6: 'English Syntax: Phrases, Clauses, and Sentences'
Week 7: 'Semantics'
Week 8: 'Spoken Discourse'
Week 9: 'Stylistics'
Week 10: 'Language Acquisition'
Week 11: 'Language Variation'
Week 12: 'American Dialects'
Week 13: 'History of English: Old to Early Modern English'
Week 14: 'History of English: Modern and Future English'

Format: Two lectures each week on Monday and Wednesday, followed by a discussion section on Friday

Assignments: Each week, one online multiple-choice comprehension exercise plus one written activity from the textbook. One take-home midterm and one take-home final exam

 

 

241: Literature and Culture 1: to the 18th Century
Lisa Cooper
MoWe 9:55-10:45am Grainger 1100

Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature

 

What is a person, a home, a nation, a world? What we now call "English literature" begins with these questions, imagining a cosmos filled with gods and heroes, liars and thieves, angels and demons, dragons and dungeons, whores and witches, drunken stupor and religious ecstasy. Authors crafted answers to these questions using technologies of writing from parchment to the printing press, and genres old and new, from epic and romance to drama and the sonnet. Emphasis will be on developing the skills of close reading, critical analysis, and writing that are of use for majors and non-majors alike, and on thinking about what it means to participate in a community (or several communities) of readers.

 

 

242: Literature and Culture II: from the 18th Century to the Present
Monique Allewaert

MoWe 12:05-12:55pm Humanities 2650

Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature

This course considers a period of unparalleled tumult: a time of vast world empires and startling new technologies, revolutions that radically redefined self and community, two cataclysmic world wars, the emergence of ideas of human rights, and the first truly global feelings of interconnectedness. How has literature captured and contributed to these dramatic upheavals? Some writers worldwide have struggled to invent new forms, new words, and new genres to do justice to a world in crisis, while others have reached back in time, seeking continuity with the past. We will explore enduring traditions of poetry and drama and think about experiments in the new, globally popular genre of the novel. This course develops skills of critical reading and writing that are essential to majors and non-majors alike.

 

 

 

245: Seminar in the Major
Lecture 001 - Aparna Dharwadker
TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm White 4208
Topic: Contemporary World Theatre in English
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
Honors Option

 

This course has three concurrent objectives aimed specifically at undergraduate students who are majoring in English:
1. To trace the historical, political, and cultural processes by which English, the “native” language of a small island nation off the European mainland, has emerged as the world’s second most commonly spoken language (after Mandarin Chinese), and a major creative medium for writers around the globe.
2. To understand the category of global “anglophone” writing, and to position drama, theatre, and performance as distinctive creative genres within this rapidly expanding oeuvre.
3. To use the plays that are the primary texts for the course, together with their relevant contexts, as the basis of substantial critical writing over an intensive the semester which will allow students to aim for increasing clarity, cogency, critical sophistication, and rhetorical effectiveness, and to resubmit their work after significant revision.

At the beginning of the course, we will take stock of the crucial factors that have established and consolidated the “empire of English” since the seventeenth century—settler and imperial colonialism, education, print culture, migration, diaspora, and technology, among others. We will also consider why leading contemporary playwrights outside Britain and North America choose to write originally in English, although the majority of them belong to cultures possessing one or more fully-developed indigenous languages. The purpose of the course as a small writing intensive experience designed for majors will underlie all our discussions and activities. Students will focus in an active and sustained way on the processes of critical reading, discussion, and writing, in preparation for more advanced work in the major as well as a long-term engagement with literature.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Derek Walcott, Ti-Jean and His Brothers (1958; In Dream on Monkey Mountain and Other Plays)
Ama Ata Aidoo, Anowa (1970)
Wole Soyinka, Death and the King’s Horseman (1975)
Brian Friel, Translations (1980)
Athol Fugard, “Master Harold” . . . And the Boys (1982)
Louis Nowra, The Golden Age (1985)
Mahesh Dattani, Dance Like a Man (1989)
Manjula Padmanabhan, Harvest (1997)
George F. Walker, Heavan (2000)

 

 

245: Seminar in the Major
Lecture 002 - TBA
TuTh 9:30-10:45am Grainger 1080
Topic:
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
Honors Option

Course Catalog Description: This small seminar, taught by a faculty member, will offer students close instruction in the principles and practices of informed, engaged, critical reading and writing. While the texts and topics vary, each seminar will reinforce fundamental skills taught across the English major, strengthening students' capacities to write and speak powerfully and to build convincing, original, well-organized arguments that persuade audiences of their significance. Students will meet with the professor in individual writing conferences and will write at least 30 pages, including drafts and informal assignments spread throughout the semester.

 

245: Seminar in the Major
Lecture 003 - Caroline Druschke
TuTh 2:30-3:45pm White 7109
Topic: “Writing Rivers”
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
Honors Option

Welcome to English 245: Seminar in the Major, “Writing Rivers.” This small, interactive seminar offers a chance for you to get to know more about the major, about each other, about Wisconsin’s waterways, and maybe even about yourselves. Through reading, writing, viewing, and doing, you’ll become more familiar with rhetorical studies and with freshwater resources in Wisconsin. As we move from literary analysis to rhetorical analysis to community engagement this semester, my hope is that you’ll find yourself equipped and inspired to take action about water-related issues you feel passionate about.

245: Seminar in the Major
Lecture 004 - Kathleen Schaag
TuTh 1:00-2:15pm White 6110
Topic: PLASTIC! Surface, Substance, Selfie
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
Honors Option

From commodities (Tupperware) and explosives (atomic bomb) to surfaces (plastic surgery) and synapses (neuroplasticity), plastics saturate the scene of 20th-21st century American culture. We'll consider the conceptual, aesthetic, and political dimensions of manufactured plastics and biological plasticity to reflect upon the relationship between self, society, and environment. Interrogating tensions between nature and artifice, surface and depth, and performance and materiality, the course will survey a plastic landscape that produces the Barbie doll as well as the cyborg. Looking at music videos, photos, plays, poems, and performances by pop artists such as Nicki Minaj and Lady Gaga and playwrights, artists, and poets such as Yoko Ono, Suzan-Lori Parks, Cindy Sherman, Cassils, Kate Durbin, and Adrian Piper, we'll explore the ways these plastic performances of material self-molding complicate social constructions of race, gender, and sexuality. Course requirements include two formal essays and a visual essay.

245: Seminar in the Major
Lecture 005 - TBA
MoWe 4:00-5:15pm Educ Sci 304
Topic: TBA
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
Honors Option

Course Catalog Description: This small seminar, taught by a faculty member, will offer students close instruction in the principles and practices of informed, engaged, critical reading and writing. While the texts and topics vary, each seminar will reinforce fundamental skills taught across the English major, strengthening students' capacities to write and speak powerfully and to build convincing, original, well-organized arguments that persuade audiences of their significance. Students will meet with the professor in individual writing conferences and will write at least 30 pages, including drafts and informal assignments spread throughout the semester.

248: Women in Ethnic American Literature
Leslie Bow
Online
This is a modular section that meets January 2, 2018 thru January 21, 2018
(Session Code XCC, 3 weeks of instruction)
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature

This online course to be completed during the winter intersession explores the intersections among race, ethnicity, gender, class, nationality, and sexuality in fiction, poetry, memoir, and visual texts by African American, Asian American, American Indian, Latina, and multiracial women in the U.S. The course is structured thematically around overlapping social issues within a cross-cultural framework, focusing on four themes in particular: racial authenticity and ethnic belonging; coming of age and externalizing the gender role; activism and radical consciousness; and race as metaphor. course reader includes work by Pat Parker, Cherríe Moraga, Alice Walker, Janice Gould, Hisaye Yamamoto, Chrystos, and Toni Morrison among others, with secondary reading by Immanuel Wallerstein, Ian Haney Lopez, Patricia J. Williams, and bell hooks. NOTE: This is an intensive, online course to be completed during three weeks of winter break prior to the start of Spring semester. The course will take place on Canvas and daily posts are required in lieu of embodied class meetings. Each of the 15 days (modules) represents a week of a traditional semester.

Required Texts
--Reader accessed on Canvas course site
--Media accessed on Canvas course site: e.g. “Real Indian,” “Born Free,” audio files: Saturday Night at the Pahala Theatre, online lectures --Books to purchase [e-versions ok]:
The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros
Saturday Night at the Pahala Theatre, Lois Ann Yamanaka
Skim, Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki
Lakota Woman, Mary Crow Dog
Bitter in the Mouth, Monique Truong

304: Composition & Rhetoric In and Beyond the University
Catherine Vieira
MoWe 2:30-3:45pm Humanities 1131
Topic: Writing in the World
Prereqs: Comm A and 3 credits English (beyond English 100)

According to recent studies, writing is on the rise, while reading is on the decline. We spend hours of our work and personal lives texting, emailing, posting, and otherwise composing. What makes writing so economically valuable, so interpersonally engaging, and so darn difficult to do well? This class answers these questions, exposing students to several theories, based in the field of composition and rhetoric, about what it means to write: cognitive, socio-historic, rhetorical, technological, and pedagogical. We will test out these theories in our own writing and on our own writing lives, as students come to know themselves as writers and to more deeply understand the complexity of the pervasive contemporary phenomenon known as writing.

307: Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction & Poetry Workshop
TA Taught Courses
Times & Places Vary
Prereqs: Junior standing or completion of one of the following: English 207 taken Fall 2014 or later; or English 203 taken prior to Fall 2014
Satisfies a Comm B requirement
Satisfies a workshop requirement for the emphasis in creative writing
Accelerated Honors (!)

This class is similar to English 207 (see above) but with greater emphasis on craft (narrative control, poetic form) and the writing process. Like 207, this class is taught as a workshop, which means class discussion will focus on both craft (published stories, poems, and essays) and, perhaps more importantly, the fiction and poetry written by each student. That is, the student writing becomes the text, and the instructor leads a sympathetic, but critical, discussion of the particular work at hand. Students should expect to read and comment on two or three published works per week as well as the work of their peers. To enable a collegial and productive class setting, all sections of 307 are capped at 16 students.

 

314: Structure of English
Anja Wanner
TuTh 11:00-12:15pm VanVleck B223

Prereqs: Sophomore standing

 

[English Language and Linguistics] (Mixed Grad/Undergrad) In this mixed grad/undergrad course we will discuss the fundamentals of the syntactic structure of English sentences. Our approach is that grammar is not something scary "out there" -- it's part of every speaker's intuitive knowledge of language and our goal is to make this knowledge visible through linguistic analysis. This course will provide you with basic tools of sentence analysis and will enable you to describe and analyze English sentences on your own. You will learn to classify words (nouns, verbs, determiners, adverbs etc.) and phrases (Noun Phrases, Verb Phrases etc.) and to give visual representations of the structure of clauses (so-called "tree diagrams"). You will learn about functions in the clause (subjects, objects, predicates, etc.) and about syntactic operations that change word order, such as passivization. One of the main points will be to develop an understanding of the relationship between word order, structure, and meaning in English. We will also address syntactic aspects of language change and of prescriptive rules like “Don’t end a sentence on a preposition!” The methods of analysis you learn in this class will be applicable in a variety of ways in your study of literature, creative writing, English education, English as a second language, and further studies in linguistics. Assessments for this class include two in-class exams (midterm and final), two graded and several ungraded homework assignments, and an in-class presentation in which you compare the syntactic characteristics from two texts from different genres (e.g., an op-ed and a scientific article on the same subject).

 

 

315: English Phonology
TBA
MoWeFr 11:00-11:50am White 4281
Prereqs: Sophomore standing

 

[English Language and Linguistics] (Mixed Grad/Undergrad) This course offers an introduction to the sound system of English, including phonetics and elementary phonology. Topics include articulatory phonetic descriptions of consonants and vowels, classical phonemic theory, the nature of phonological processes, linguistic change and the acquisition of phonological systems. By the end of the course, students should be able to describe and transcribe speech sounds of English, recognize and describe phonemic and phono tactic patterns and account for basic phonological processes.

 

318: Second Language Acquisition Jacee Cho TuTh 2:30-3:45pm Van Vleck B215 Prereqs: Sophomore Standing

 

[English Language and Linguistics] (Mixed Grad/Undergrad) A central characteristic of human beings is LANGUAGE as man is the only animal capable of language (homo loquens). The ability to acquire and use language is uniquely human. Another distinctively human capacity is the ability to learn languages other than the mother tongue throughout the lifespan. Indeed, data show that there are more bi/multilinguals than monolinguals in the world (~60% in Europe, ~25% in the US, 99% in Luxembourg!). In this course, we will discuss some of the current theories on how people acquire/learn a non-native, or second language (L2). We will survey both quantitative and qualitative research on how a second language is acquired, represented and processed in the mind/brain and discuss theoretical and practical implications of the current L2 research. Topics to be discussed in this course include formal (linguistic) characteristics of interlanguage (developing learner’s L2), the role of Universal Grammar and native language in L2 acquisition, crosslinguistic influence (how L1 and L2 influence each other), and nonlanguage factors such as age of acquisition (whether and how much age of acquisition matters), verbal aptitude, and motivation.

 

319: Language, Race, and Identity Thomas Purnell MoWeFr 12:05-12:55pm White 4281 Prereqs: Sophomore standing

[English Language and Linguistics] (Mixed Grad/Undergrad) This course examines the role of language in the social construction of racial identity in the US. Combining research and theory from anthropology, biology, psychology, sociology, and linguistics, this course emphasizes the important relations between language, culture, and our genetic endowment specific to humans. We begin with a brief study of current theories on the language faculty and the social construction of race. We then address the different language issues facing the identity of speakers within speech communities with strong non-standard components (African Americans, Latinos/as, Native Americans, Asian Americans). This course positions basic linguistic concepts (on language structure, for example) within the context of the interface between language and culture/biology.

334: Eighteenth Century Literature and Culture Mark Vareschi TuTh 9:30-10:45am Humanities 2637 Topic: Surveillance and Eighteenth-Century Literature (and beyond) Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature

Perhaps no topic has received more attention than surveillance in our contemporary culture. Following on the revelations of National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden that nearly every bit of international and domestic online and voice communication was or could be monitored, saved, and analyzed we have seen an explosion of scholarly and popular writing on surveillance. In this course, we will seek to understand the long history of surveillance, its literary representations, and those formations that precede current practices from the 18th through the 21st centuries. Readings will be drawn from authors like Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, William Wordsworth, George Orwell, John Brunner, and Cory Doctorow.

351: Modernist Novel Sarah Anderson MoWe 2:30-3:45pm Education L150 Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature

Welcome to early 20th Century American fiction. In this course, we will cover texts from Cather’s Midwest to Faulkner’s South, from Hemingway’s Europe to Ann Petry’s Harlem and Steinbeck’s California. The course will teach you important social and historical contexts for understanding the dynamic literary changes in fiction writing during this time period. We will discuss gender roles, racial conflicts, class, and more as we challenge traditional interpretations of these classic texts, seeking out new ways of reading and understanding. Some selections are written by authors explicitly dedicated to the modernist imperative to "make it new," whereas others engage with their cultural context in less self-conscious ways. Our examination will draw from literary criticism, historical documents, as well as your own writing. This is a reading and writing intensive course. You can expect to read roughly 80 pages per class meeting, and to produce writing assignments and a reading journal. This course is a discussion-based seminar with some lecturing that requires your daily participation.

400: Advanced Composition Mary Fiorenza Th 2:30-5:00pm White 4281 Prereqs: Completion of Comm A and Comm B; English 100, English 201, English 203 (prior to Fall 2014) or English 207 recommended. Junior or Senior standing

Who are you writing for? What do you have to say? What’s the best way to say it, and why does it matter? This course provides a workspace and community to explore those questions and help you develop into a more skillful, creative, and rhetorically aware writer. You’ll write nonfiction stories, essays, or articles about issues, experiences, or subjects that matter to you, and you’ll connect them to the larger world through research, reading, other media, and your own choices. You’ll be asked to try out a variety of approaches and reflect on the strategies you choose. Readings will focus on contemporary essays, creative nonfiction, and writing itself. Class time will be spent in workshops and discussions of both published texts and student writing. There will be frequent writing exercises. Among our interests will be audience, style, voice, form, process, and practice. At the end of the semester, each writer will prepare a final portfolio of revised work.

Possible required texts: Best American Essay 2017 OR other recent essay collection
Joseph Harris, Rewriting: How To Do Things with Texts

407: Creative Writing: Nonfiction Workshop Danielle Evans We 5:30-7:25pm White 7105 Prereqs: English 207 or 307 completed Fall 2014 or later; or, English 203 or 300 completed prior to Fall 2014. All others may apply for admittance by submitting an application and writing sample the last week of classes during the preceding semester. No student may register for or be enrolled in more than one Creative Writing course in a given semester without approval of the program coordinator

Course Catalog Description: This course explores a variety of non-fictional prose writing forms including (at the instructor's discretion) personal essay, memoir, travel writing, opinion pieces, investigative journalism, public science writing, and natural history writing. Some time is spent on theory and technique; some time is spent reading the work of established writers; some short writing exercises may be assigned. The major focus of the course is on student writing, both in the classroom and in individual conferences.

408: Creative Writing: Fiction Workshop
Instructors, Times & Places Vary
Prereqs: Completion of one of the following with a 3.0 or higher: English 207 or 307 taken Fall 2014 or later; or English 203 taken prior to Fall 2014

 

This class helps students apply lessons from published fiction (both classic and contemporary) to their own work. Class typically begins with a lecture concerning some aspect of craft, and is followed by “workshop.” This entails a discussion of story shape, word choice, character development etc. using the creative work of the student as the text. Classes are small (15), and students are expected to read the work of their peers carefully and participate during class discussions. Students who do not meet the prerequisite may submit a writing sample to the program director on Monday of the last week of classes.

 

 

409: Creative Writing: Poetry Workshop
Tiana Clark
Tu 2:30-4:30pm White 6108
Prereqs: Completion of one of the following with a 3.0 or higher: English 207 or 307 taken Fall 2014 or later; or English 203, 300-307 taken prior to Fall 2014 Accelerated Honors (!)

Welcome to intermediate poetry workshop. In this class, our focus is on both reading & writing poetry. While the bulk of class will be dedicated to generating your work and critiquing your classmates’ work, we will also read and discuss the work of some contemporary and classic poets. You will each submit your own original work, which we will then discuss as a group—discussing what was accomplished well, and what can be improved.

Using The Poet's Companion as our guide, we’ll tackle a different elements of poetic craft each week: anaphora, form, lyric v. narrative, etc. As the semester progresses, you’ll gradually build a vocabulary of poetry and possess an increasingly diverse toolkit to draw upon when writing your own poems.

This is a generative workshop, so take this as permission: take risks. Make mistakes. Go wild. The workshop here is to support each writer’s imagination and growth, not stifle it.

410: Creative Writing: Playwriting Workshop
Jennifer Plants
Mo 2:30-5:00pm Humanities 2653
Prereqs: English 207 or 307 required. All others may apply for admittance by submitting an application and writing sample the last week of classes during the proceding semester. No student may register for or be enrolled in more than one Creative Writing course in a given semester without approval of the program coordinator

What is a play? Why do writers choose such a form? What differentiates the language of action required by the stage from other narrative forms? What role do playwrights play in the art of theatrical collaboration? We'll start with the most basic questions and examine them by experimenting all semester with our own writing for the stage in realistic, autobiographical and experimental forms. Guest artists, attendance at local theatrical events, in-class exercises and readings of student work will be integral to the class structure. Learn more about what forms and writers are popular on the American stage and why, all the while creating short works of your own that will lay the groundwork for further writing and exploration.

411: Creative Writing: Special Topics Workshop
Lecture 001 – Amy Quan Barry
Mo 1:20-3:15pm White 6108
Topic: Traditional Poetic Forms
Prereqs: ENGL 207, 307, 407, 409, 410, 411, or 511. Or, ENGLISH 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306 taken prior to Fall 2014 Accelerated Honors (!)

In this course we'll study a wide range of poetic forms spanning the last few thousand years all the way up to the digital age. Forms we'll be studying include the sonnet, villanelle, ghazal, cross-outs, and flarf, and we'll conclude with each student inventing a form of their own.

411: Creative Writing: Special Topics Workshop
Lecture 002 – Oliver Bendorf
We 1:15-3:15 pm White 7109
Topic: Queer Poetics
Prereqs: ENGL 207, 307, 407, 409, 410, 411, or 511. Or, ENGLISH 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306 taken prior to Fall 2014 Accelerated Honors (!)

This course is a workshop on formal experimentation, lyric possibility, and queer methods of making meaning. One way to define Poetics, as Roland Barthes suggested, is as the study of “how meaning is possible, at what cost and by what means." Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick defined Queer as “the open mesh of possibilities, gaps, overlaps, dissonances and resonances, lapses and excesses of meaning when the constituent elements of anyone's gender, of anyone's sexuality aren't made (or can't be made) to signify monolithically.” Students will work at this juncture of Queer Poetics through close reading and creative and critical responses.

Students will follow a creative writing practice of their own design, and be able to articulate a poetics out of that practice. In addition, each week we will explore a particular set of texts and together map what we can learn from that combination about Queer Poetics. Texts will include poetry and essays on poetics, along with films, archival sources, and hybrid texts. We will study a range of poetry in relation to its queer possibility, and examine its participation in and/or resistance to literary traditions and the certainty of formal and categorical boundaries. How is queer meaning made? What roles do power, desire, and identity play in these practices?

(Please note: you do not have to identify as queer, or as any other such non-normative sexual/gender identity, to take or succeed in this class; you do need to maintain a genuine openness to the intellectual, critical, and creative possibilities of queerness. This openness will be evident through the written assignments you complete, as well as in the verbal dialogue you engage in with your classmates.)

Students will understand and be able to discuss some of the core concepts and methodologies of Queer Theory and Poetics, and be able to engage with current scholarship in each of these fields. Students will be able to design and undertake a creative writing project, and articulate that practice in an analytical poetics essay.

415: Introduction to TESOL Methods
TBA
TuTh 1:00-2:15pm Science 360
Prereqs: Sophomore standing & consent of instructor

Course Catalog Description: An introduction to the teaching of English to speakers of other languages. Exploration of the contexts in which English is taught, and methods and materials used to teach it. Students who have taken English 334 prior to fall 2014 may not enroll in this course.

 

420: Topics in English Language and Linguistics
Lecture 001 – Thomas Purnell
MoWeFr 1:20-2:10pm White 4281
Topic: Dialect Geography
Prereqs: Sophomore standing

[English Language and Linguistics] (Mixed Grad/Undergrad) This course provides an introduction to how the relationship between local speech patterns and geographic forms interact. Some time is spent on how this relationship has developed over the last 200 years, how representations (maps) influence the perception and description of speech patterns, and fieldwork necessary to produce a linguistic atlas.

420: Topics in English Language and Linguistics
Lecture 002 - Jacee Cho
TuTh 9:30-10:45am Humanities 2261
Topic: Universal Grammar and Child Language Acquisition
Prereqs: Sophomore standing

[English Language and Linguistics] (Mixed Grad/Undergrad) This course provides an introduction to the linguistic study of child language acquisition. Children attain adult-like linguistic knowledge by the age of 5-6 without any explicit instruction or correction from their caregivers. In this course, we will examine the properties of the human mind that make language so easily accessible to all normally developing children and discuss evidence for the claim that children are born with built-in universal linguistic principles (Universal Grammar) that constrain language acquisition. We will discuss experimental methods on child language acquisition. We will cover child first language/monolingual acquisition as well as child bilingual acquisition (children acquiring two languages simultaneously). We will also discuss language development of blind children, children with autism, and children with SLI (specific language impairment). All reading materials will be available electronically on the course website.

422: Outstanding Figure(s) in Literature before 1800
Ronald Harris
MoWeFr 1:20-2:10pm Education L185
Topic: Christopher Marlowe Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
Honors Option (%)

Christopher Marlowe burst onto the Elizabethan theater scene while still a college student, dazzling audiences with heroes who dreamed of world conquest and defied the limits that confine mere mortals. His poems and plays inspired a generation of English writers, including William Shakespeare, his sometime friend and rival.

Despite success as a playwright, Marlowe graduated from college facing the worst possible job market. With limited prospects, he cobbled together a life as a poet and a spy, a heretic and a counterfeiter, a gentleman and a rogue. He died before his 30th birthday, stabbed in a bar under mysterious circumstances, over “the reckoning.” (Was it a dispute over the bar tab? A lovers’ quarrel? Assassination? No one knows, though books have been written on the subject.) In between, Marlowe wrote classics that addressed themes as important today as they were four hundred years ago: personal ambition and intellectual overreach, religious conflict and civil unrest, power and sexual identity.

In the class we will read everything Marlowe wrote in his too-brief life: seven plays, two translations from the Latin classics, and a handful of poems. Many, such as “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” and Doctor Faustus, are familiar still. The Jew of Malta anticipates contemporary religious conflicts in the Middle East and Africa. Edward II concerns itself with homosexuality and power, while Hero and Leander recounts the tragic tale of a long-distance relationship between two young lovers. Tamburlaine the Great rises from lowly shepherd to conquer the world, yet he cannot save his beloved wife from dying of illness. There’s more, much more. We will read his works chronologically in their Elizabethan context, but we will consider too how Marlowe’s writings continue to speak to us today about important problems in our own world.

Materials
1. Christopher Marlowe: The Complete Plays (Penguin)
2. Christopher Marlowe: The Complete Poems and Translations (Penguin Classics)
3. David Riggs, The World of Christopher Marlowe (Faber & Faber/Henry Holt; recommended, on reserve at College Library

431: Early Works of Shakespeare
TBA
TuTh 4:00-5:15pm Humanities 1221
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature

Course Catalog Description: Four plays through 1600, with the reading of several others. Students who have taken English 417 prior to fall 2014 may not enroll in this course.

444: Topic in Romantic or Victorian Literature or Culture
Nancy Marshall
MoWe 4:15-5:30pm Elvehjem L166
Topic: Fairies & Steampunk
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
This is a combined section class

Course Catalog Description: Topic varies from year to year.

455: A Study of an Outstanding Figure or Figures in American Literature
Jeffrey Steele
MoWeFr 12:05-12:55pm White 4208
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature

Course Catalog Description: Subject differs each year.

456: Topic in Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture
Russ Castronovo
Online
This is a modular section that meets January 2, 2018 thru January 21, 2018
(Session Code XCC, 3 weeks of instruction)
Topic: Rebels and American Literature
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature

How does literature intersect with rebellion and revolution? Literature promotes values commonly associated with the social order, which is why we learn about literature in school. But literary works often seem to have proximity to political violence and social unrest. As we move from Revolutionary-era Boston to Occupy Wall Street, we will explore the relationship between literature and social and political movements associated with the radicalism of slave resistance, anti-capitalist demonstrators, turn-of-the-century feminism, and other conflicts. As we do so we’ll also think about different literary modes and forms, including manifestos, satire, short stories, poetry, and the novel. Readings include works by Ben Franklin, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Kate Chopin, Langston Hughes.

457: Topic in American Literature and Culture since 1900
Monique Allewaert
MoWe 2:30-3:45pm Humanities 1641
Topic: Art in the Anthropocene
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature

In 2000, Paul Crutzen and Eugene Stoermer proposed that the late eighteenth century marked the beginning of the Anthropocene, a term they coined to describe the period in which human beings emerged as a geomorphic force capable of changing the weather, among other things. How did humanistic knowledges and productions contribute to getting us into our current predicament, and what roles might it have in addressing the challenges of the Anthropocene? Which genres (realism, sci fi, poetry, graphic novels, blockbuster films), which modes (comedy, satire, tragedy, pastoral, elegy) are especially capable (or incapable) of helping us recognize and respond to the challenges of the Anthropocene? What are the hazards of accepting the term Anthropocene, and how might other ways of naming our epoch like Capitalocene, Plantationocene, and Chthulucene give us new critical tools and new archives?

We will read theoretical and philosophical works, critical analyses, and literary works over the course of the term. Readings likely to include works by John Locke, John Keats, Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, H.P. Lovecraft, Aldo Leopold, George Saunders, Octavia Butler, Cormac McCarthy, Ben Lerner, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Ursula Heise, Rob Nixon, Amitav Ghosh, Zadie Smith, Jason Moore, Dana Luciano, Donna Haraway, Anna Tsing.

Requirements: reading quizzes; 5 short (3 page) papers; 2 long (10 page) papers.

514: English Syntax
Anja Wanner
TuTh 1:00-2:15pm Education L177
Prereqs: Must have taken English 314 in Fall 2014 or later, or English 324 prior to Fall 2014

[English Language and Linguistics] (Mixed Grad/Undergrad) In this class we will apply the framework of Generative Grammar to the analysis of sentences in English. You will learn to identify complex syntactic constructions in a sentence and give visual representations ('tree diagrams') of their structures. The type of constructions and the theoretical concepts that we will discuss goes well beyond the material from English 314 (The Structure of English). Every student will become the expert for one particular construction (such as the relative clause, the resultative construction, the subjunctive, or the imperative) and will compare and evaluate two different approaches to that particular construction. Tree diagrams will get fairly complex in this class, but what really makes this an advanced class is the focus on the ability to construct a syntactic argument: What makes a construction interesting/challenging from a linguistic perspective? Why is one analysis better than another? What are problems that remain unsolved? This class makes use of a textbook and is organized around weekly homework assignments. Assessments include a take-home midterm exam, an open-book final exam, several quizzes, an in-class presentation, and, for graduate students, a literature review.

533: Topic in Literature and the Environment
Lecture 001 - Jessica Lehman/Ella Mershon
TuTh 2:30-3:45pm Humanities 1221
Topic: Reading the Ocean
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
Meets with Geography 675

With the emergence of an interdisciplinary “oceanic turn,” the ocean has come to represent utopian possibilities for reimagining and redefining the boundaries that distinguish peoples, territories, and typologies. No longer viewed as a blank expanse ‘out there,’ critical ocean studies ask us to reconsider the mutual entanglement of marine and terrestrial life. As the historian of science, Naomi Oreskes, contends, “this shift in understanding—from the ocean as deep, dark, vast, mostly inaccessible and not terribly important to the ocean as a vast abode of life, both familiar and strange, and a place on which all life, both marine and terrestrial, depends—is one of the most important cultural and scientific shifts of the twentieth century.” Meeting with Geography 675, this interdisciplinary course will explore both the precursors and implications of this shift for scholarship in the social sciences and humanities. Questioning the possibilities and limitations of transoceanic approaches to literary and geographic analyses, we will explore how conceptions of the nation, territory, citizenship, and diaspora—how narratives of exploration, imperialism, and the global economy—how investigations of marine life, multi-species ecologies, and materialist histories—have shaped and been shaped by this shift in our understanding of the sea.

Literary texts may include: Olaudah Equiano, Interesting Narrative; Mary Prince, The History of Mary Prince; Poe, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket; Melville, Benito Cereno; Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea, V. S. Naipaul, The Middle Passage; Derek Walcott, Omeros; and Virginia Woolf, The Waves.

Readings from theorists and critics may include: Stephen Helmreich, Peter Linebaugh and Marcus Rediker, Philip Steinberg, Ian Baucom, Paul Gilroy, Epeli Hau'ofa, Edouard Glissant, Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley, Christina Sharpe, Elizabeth Deloughrey, and C. L. R. James.

Secondary historical materials might include: excerpts from The Journals of Captain Cook and Charles Darwin’s Voyage of the Beagle.

533: Topic in Literature and the Environment
Lecture 002 - Caroline Druschke
TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm Van Vleck B215
Topic: Rhetoric, Science, and Public Engagement
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
Meets with Envir St 404

This undergraduate course focuses on theoretical and practical aspects of public engagement with scientific research, policy, and management. During the semester, we’ll explore University of Wisconsin’s land grant mandate to share university research with the public and use university resources to explore public needs. We’ll build from readings in rhetoric of science and public participation in scientific research, and we’ll hear from experts in Wisconsin working on a variety of projects with public stakeholders. At the end of the class, you’ll use what you’ve learned about the theory and practice of public engagement to design, execute, and assess an activity that engages a segment of the public in scientific research. In short, this class is about both learning and doing.

545: Feminist Theory and Women’s Writing in English
Lecture 001 - Ellen Samuels
TuTh 2:30-3:45pm Sterling 1339
Topic: Feminist Disability Studies
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
This is a combined section class

This course will explore a broad range of contemporary feminist and queer disability writings with a focus on literary texts and concerns. We will consider how bodyminds, embodiment, neurodiversity, and capacity/debility are figured and configured in intersection with race, gender, sexuality, nation, and citizenship. This is a reading intensive course which will give students a broad grounding in feminist disability studies as well as a focused understanding of critical approaches to specific texts. Texts will include Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Yellow Wallpaper; Harriet Wilson, Our Nig, or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black; Indra Sinha, Animal’s People; selected poems; and theoretical readings by Alison Kafer, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Sami Schalk, Robert McRuer, Margaret Price, Jasbir Puar, and others.

545: Feminist Theory and Women’s Writing in English
Lecture 002 - Sarah Anderson
MoWeFr 9:55-10:45am White 4281
Topic: Feminism in 20th Century American Literature
Prereqs: 6 credits of introductory literature
This is a combined section class

This course will examine literature of the 20th century in order to explore the women’s rights movement. The course will be divided into the three larger sections (First Wave, Second Wave and Third Wave Feminisms) with various topics in each, such as: women writers of the Harlem Renaissance, experimental novels that sought to portray women’s mental struggles, the coopting of women’s work, criticisms of white, suburban life, works by women of color throughout the century, contemporary feminisms, and more.

Class meetings with consist of discussion and some lecture. Assignments include: reading journal, short papers and final project of your own design.

Assigned Readings may include (but are subject to change): Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, H.D.’s novel HERmione, Willa Cather’s A Lost Lady, Grace Paley, Adrienne Rich, Alice Walker, Citizen by Claudia Rankine, and more.