Books by Literary Studies Faculty

Scholarly books published by current Literary Studies faculty members, with most recent titles listed first.

Monographs

  • Book Cover for "Roomscape"

    Roomscape: Women Writers in the British Museum from George Eliot to Virginia Woolf

    Susan David Bernstein

    Edinburgh University Press

    2013

    Susan David Bernstein argues not only that the British Museum Reading Room facilitated various practices of women's literary traditions, she also questions the overdetermined value of privacy and autonomy in constructions of female authorship, a principle generated from Woolf's feminist manifesto. Rather than viewing reading and writing as solitary, individual events, Roomscape considers the meaning of exteriority and the public and social and gendered dimensions of literary production.

  • Ariel’s Ecology: Personhood and Colonialism in the American Tropics, 1760-1820

    Monique Allewaert

    University of Minnesota Press

    2013

    What happens if we abandon the assumption that a person is a discrete, world-making agent who acts on and creates place? This, Monique Allewaert contends, is precisely what occurred on eighteenth-century American plantations, where labor practices and ecological particularities threatened the literal and conceptual boundaries that separated persons from the natural world.

  • Dorothy West's Paradise: A Biography of Class and Color

    Cherene Sherrard-Johnson

    Rutgers University Press

    2012

    An essential book for both fans of West's fiction and students of race, class, and American women's lives, Dorothy West's Paradise offers an intimate biography of an important author and a privileged glimpse into the society that shaped her work.

  • The Emblematics of the Self: Ekphrasis and Identity in Renaissance Imitations of Greek Romance

    Elizabeth Bearden

    University of Toronto Press

    2012

    The ancient Greek romances of Achilles Tatius and Heliodorus were widely imitated by early modern writers such as Miguel de Cervantes, Philip Sidney, and Mary Wroth. Like their Greek models, Renaissance romances used ekphrasis, or verbal descriptions of visual representation, as a tool for characterization. The Emblematics of the Self shows how the women, foreigners, and non-Christians of these tales reveal their identities and desires in their responses to the ‘verbal pictures’ of romance.

  • Book Cover for "Clandestine Marriage"

    Clandestine Marriage: Botany and Romantic Culture

    Theresa Kelley

    The Johns Hopkins University Press

    2012

    Clandestine Marriage explores the meaning and methods of how plants were represented and reproduced in scientific, literary, artistic, and material cultures of the period. Theresa M. Kelley synthesizes romantic debates about taxonomy and morphology, the contemporary interest in books and magazines devoted to plant study and images, and writings by such authors as Mary Wollstonecraft and Anna Letitia Barbauld. 

  • Book Cover for "Artisans and Narrative Craft"

    Artisans and Narrative Craft in Late Medieval England

    Lisa Cooper

    Cambridge University Press

    2011

    Lisa H. Cooper offers new insight into the relationship of material practice and literary production in the Middle Ages by exploring the representation of craft labor in England from c.1000-1483. She examines genres as diverse as the school-text, comic poem, spiritual allegory, and mirror for princes, and works by authors both well-known (Chaucer, Lydgate, Caxton) and far less so. 

  • Literature, Language, and the Rise of the Intellectual Disciplines in Britain, 1680-1820

    Robin Valenza

    Cambridge University Press

    2011

    In this interdisciplinary study, Robin Valenza shows how Isaac Newton, Samuel Johnson, David Hume, Adam Smith, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth invented new intellectual languages. By offering a much-needed account of the rise of the modern disciplines, Valenza shows why the sciences and humanities diverged so strongly, and argues that literature has a special role in navigating between the languages of different areas of thought.

  • Book Cover for "Thinking Poetry"

    Thinking Poetry: Readings in Contemporary Women's Exploratory Poetics

    Lynn Keller

    University of Iowa Press

    2010

    Thinking Poetry examines approaches to women’s poetic exploration ranging from radically open, thoroughly disjunctive writing to feminist experimentation within relatively conventional free verse forms; from texts testing the resources of visual elements and page space to those in which multilingualism or digital technology provide arenas for innovation; from revitalized forms of ekphrasis to fresh approaches to pop culture.

  • Book Cover for "Partly Colored"

    Partly Colored: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South

    Leslie Bow

    New York University Press

    2010

    2012 Honorable mention for the Book Award in Cultural Studies from the Association for Asian American Studies

    By elucidating the experience of interstitial ethnic groups such as Mexican, Asian, and Native Americans—groups that are held to be neither black nor white—Leslie Bow explores how the color line accommodated, or refused to accommodate, “other” ethnicities within a binary racial system.

  • The Novel as Event

    Mario Ortiz-Robles

    University of Michigan Press

    2010

    The Novel as Event is a timely reconsideration of the historical role of the Victorian novel from the perspective of its performativity. In a highly original application of the work of Jacques Derrida, Paul de Man, Pierre Bourdieu, Judith Butler, and other readers of J. L. Austin, Robles argues that the language of the novel is paramount and the current emphasis on the representational and physical aspects of the novel tends to obscure this fact.
  • Race and the Avant-Garde: Experimental and Asian American Poetry Since 1965

    Timothy Yu

    Stanford University Press

    2009

    A groundbreaking study of contemporary American poetry, Race and the Avant-Garde changes the way we think about race and literature. Examining two of the most exciting developments in recent American writing, Timothy Yu juxtaposes the works of experimental language poets and Asian American poets—concerned primarily with issues of social identity centered around discourses of race.
  • Portraits of the New Negro Woman: Visual and Literary Culture in the Harlem Renaissance

    Cherene Sherrard-Johnson

    Rutgers University Press

    2007

    Of all the images to arise from the Harlem Renaissance, the most thought-provoking were those of the mulatta. Due to the mulatta's frequent ability to pass for white, she represented a variety of contradictory meanings that often transcended racial, class, and gender boundaries. Portraits of the New Negro Woman investigates the visual and literary images of black femininity that occurred between the two world wars.
  • Book Cover for "Beautiful Democracy"

    Beautiful Democracy: Aesthetics and Anarchy in a Global Era

    Russ Castronovo

    University of Chicago Press

    2007

    Are aesthetic experiences always a social good? Could aesthetics also inspire violent crime, working-class unrest, and racial murder? To answer these questions, Russ Castronovo turns to those who debated claims that art could democratize culture - civic reformers, anarchists, novelists, civil rights activists, and college professors - to reveal that beauty provides unexpected occasions for radical, even revolutionary, political thinking.

  • Provoking Democracy: Why We Need the Arts

    Caroline Levine

    Blackwell

    2007

    This ground-breaking book provides a provocative and compelling exploration of the complex relationship between democracy and the arts. It analyses the roles of dissenting and unpopular artists, such as Jackson Pollock, Bertolt Brecht, D. H. Lawrence, and 2 Live Crew in twentieth century society.

  • Book Cover for "Romanticism after Auschwitz"

    Romanticism after Auschwitz

    Sara Guyer

    Stanford University Press

    2007

    Romanticism After Auschwitz reveals how post-Holocaust testimony remains romantic, and shows why romanticism must therefore be rethought. The book argues that what literary historians have traditionally called "romanticism" should be redescribed in light of two circumstances: first, the specific inadequacy of literary-historical models before "romantic" works; and, second, the particular function that these unsettling aspects of "romantic" works have after Auschwitz. 

  • Book Cover for "Drama at the Courts of Queen Henrietta Maria"

    Drama at the Courts of Queen Henrietta Maria

    Karen Britland

    Cambridge University Press

    2006

    Drama at the Courts of Queen Henrietta Maria considers Queen Henrietta Maria's patronage of drama in England in the light of her French heritage. Britland challenges a common view of Henrietta Maria as a meddlesome woman whose actions contributed to the outbreak of the English civil wars and demonstrates how the queen consort's cultural and political positions were reflected in the plays and court masques she sponsored.  She also provides new information about Henrietta Maria's civil war exile.

  • Panic!: Markets, Crises, and Crowds in American Fiction

    David Zimmerman

    University of North Carolina Press

    2006

    A Nota Bene selection of The Chronicle of Higher Education

    In Panic!, David A. Zimmerman studies how American novelists and their readers imagined--and in one case, incited--market crashes and financial panics. Panic! examines how Americans' attitudes toward securities markets, popular investment, and financial catastrophe were entangled with their conceptions of gender, class, crowds, corporations, and history.

  • Book Cover for "Theatres of Independence"

    Theatres of Independence: Drama, Theory, and Urban Performance in India Since 1947

    Aparna Dharwadker

    Oxford University Press & University of Iowa Press

    2005

    Winner of the prestigious Joe A. Callaway Prize for the Best Book in Drama and Theatre (2005)

    Theatres of Independence is a comprehensive study of drama, theatre, and urban performance in post-independence India. Combining theatre history with theoretical analysis and literary interpretation, Aparna Dharwadker examines the unprecedented conditions for writing and performance that the experience of new nationhood created in a dozen major Indian languages.

  • Arrest the Music!: Fela and His Rebel Art and Music

    Tejumola Olaniyan

    Indiana University Press

    2004

    finalist, 2005 ARSC award

    Looking at the social context, instrumentation, lyrics, visual art, people, and organizations through which Fela produced his music, Tejumola Olaniyan offers a wider, more suggestive perspective on Fela and his impact on listeners in all parts of the world.

  • The Serious Pleasures of Suspense: Victorian Realism and Narrative Doubt

    Caroline Levine

    University of Virginia Press

    2003

    The Serious Pleasures of Suspense argues that a startling array of nineteenth-century thinkers—from John Ruskin and Michael Faraday to Charlotte Brontë and Wilkie Collins —saw suspense as the perfect vehicle for a radically new approach to knowledge that they called "realism."

  • Representing Revolution in Milton and His Contemporaries: Religion, Politics, and Polemics in Radical Puritanism

    David Loewenstein

    Cambridge University Press

    2001

    This book is a wide-ranging exploration of the interactions of literature, polemics and religious politics in the English Revolution. Loewenstein highlights the powerful spiritual beliefs and religious ideologies in the polemical struggles of Milton, Marvell and their radical Puritan contemporaries during these revolutionary decades.

  • Double Crossings: Madness, Sexuality, and Imperialism

    Anne McClintock

    Ronsdale

    2001

    In her University of British Columbia Sedgwick Lecture for 2000, Professor Anne McClintock ranges from England to America, to the Congo and South Africa, and from the early nineteenth century to the present. She reveals the connections among gender, race and madness created by the dominant power centers.
  • Book Cover for "Necro Citizenship"

    Necro Citizenship: Death, Eroticism, and the Public Sphere in the Nineteenth-Century United States

    Russ Castronovo

    Duke University Press

    2001

    In Necro Citizenship Russ Castronovo argues that the meaning of citizenship in the United States during the nineteenth century was bound to - and even dependent on - death. Deploying an impressive range of literary and cultural texts, Castronovo interrogates an American public sphere that fetishized death as a crucial point of political identification.

  • Transfiguring America: Myth, Ideology, and Mourning in Margaret Fuller's Writing

    Jeffrey Steele

    University of Missouri Press

    2001

    Transfiguring America is the product of more than ten years of research and numerous published articles on Margaret Fuller, arguably America's first feminist theorist and one of the most important woman writers in the nineteenth century. Focusing on Fuller's development of a powerful language that paired cultural critique with mythmaking, Steele shows why her writing had such a vital impact on the woman's rights movement and modern conceptions of gender.

  • Perform or Else: From Discipline to Performance

    Jon McKenzie

    Routledge

    2001

    In Perform or Else Jon McKenzie asserts that there is a relationship between cultural, organisational, and technological performance. In this theoretical tour de force McKenzie demonstrates that all three paradigms operate together to create powerful and contradictory pressures to 'perform…or else.'
  • Book Cover for "Betrayal & Other Acts of Subversion"

    Betrayal & Other Acts of Subversion: Feminism, Sexual Politics, Asian American Women's Literature

    Leslie Bow

    Princeton University Press

    2001

    Leslie Bow here explores how representations of females transgressing the social order play out in literature by Asian American women. Beginning with the notion that feminist and Asian American identity are mutually exclusive, she analyzes how women serve as boundary markers between ethnic or national collectives in order to reveal the male-based nature of social cohesion.

  • Dreambirds: The Strange History of the Ostrich in Fashion, Food, and Fortune

    Rob Nixon

    Picador

    2000

    Rob Nixon grew up near the South African desert where ostriches first boomed, and had an early passion for the outsize bird. Later, his rejection of apartheid led him to immigrate to the United States, where he encountered a new wave of ostrich mania: American ranchers were trying to convert the gawky bird into a low-cal cuisine. Part memoir, part travelogue, Dreambirds is a natural history of a fantasy and a beautifully crafted, candid revelation of a man's soul.
  • Book Cover for "Mappings"

    Mappings: Feminism and the Cultural Geographies of Encounter

    Susan Stanford Friedman

    Princeton University Press

    1998

    In this powerful work, Susan Friedman moves feminist theory out of paralyzing debates about us and them, white and other, first and third world, and victimizers and victims. Throughout, Friedman adapts current cultural theory from global and transnational studies, anthropology, and geography to challenge modes of thought that exaggerate the boundaries of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and national origin.

  • Book Cover for "Forms of Expansion"

    Forms of Expansion: Recent Long Poems by Women

    Lynn Keller

    University of Chicago Press

    1997

    Expanding the boundaries of both genre and gender, contemporary American women are writing long poems in a variety of styles that repossess history, reconceive female subjectivity, and revitalize poetry itself. In the first book devoted to long poems by women, Lynn Keller explores this rich and evolving body of work, offering revealing discussions of the diverse traditions and feminist concerns addressed by poets ranging from Rita Dove and Sharon Doubiago to Judy Grahn and Susan Howe.

  • Book Cover for "Reinventing Allegory"

    Reinventing Allegory

    Theresa Kelley

    Cambridge University Press

    1997

    Winner, Best Scholarly Book, South Central Modern Language Association (1998).

    Reinventing Allegory asks how and why allegory has survived as a literary mode from the late Renaissance to the postmodern present. By using a series of key historical moments to define the special character of modern allegory, this study offers an important framework for assessing allegory's role in contemporary literary culture.

  • Book Cover for "Confessional Subjects"

    Confessional Subjects: Revelations of Gender and Power in Victorian Literature and Culture

    Susan David Bernstein

    University of North Carolina Press

    1997

    Susan Bernstein examines the gendered power relationships embedded in confessional literature of the Victorian period. Exploring this dynamic in Charlotte Bronta's Villette, Mary Elizabeth Braddon's Lady Audley's Secret, George Eliot'sDaniel Deronda, and Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles, she argues that although women's disclosures to male confessors repeatedly depict wrongdoing committed against them, they themselves are viewed as the transgressors. 

  • Samuel Beckett and the End of Modernity

    Richard Begam

    Stanford University Press

    1996

    This study explores the relation between Samuel Beckett's five major novels - Murphy, Watt, Molloy, Malone Dies, andThe Unnamable - and the phenomenon that Lyotard, Habermas, and Vattimo have described as the "end of modernity." Through close readings of Beckett's "pentalogy," Prof. Begam shows how these novels, written between 1935 and 1950, strikingly anticipate many of the defining themes and ideas of Barthes, Foucault, and Derrida.

  • Book Cover for "Fathering the Nation"

    Fathering the Nation: American Genealogies of Slavery and Freedom

    Russ Castronovo

    University of California Press

    1995

    Fathering the Nation examines competing expressions of national memory appearing in a wide range of mid-nineteenth-century artifacts, including slave autobiography, classic American fiction, monumental architechture, myths of the Revolution, proslavery writing, and landscape painting. While these images, icons, and fictions attempt to present an ordered, inspiring narrative of America, they also tell other stories that disrupt the nation.

  • Imperial Leather: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest

    Anne McClintock

    Routledge

    1995

    Imperial Leather chronicles the dangerous liaisons between gender, race and class that shaped British imperialism and its bloody dismantling.
  • Scars of Conquest/Masks of Resistance: The Invention of Cultural Identities in African, African-American, and Caribbean Drama

    Tejumola Olaniyan

    Oxford University Press

    1995

    This original work redefines and broadens our understanding of the drama of the English-speaking African diaspora. Looking closely at the work of Amiri Baraka, Nobel prize-winners Wole Soyinka and Derek Walcott, and Ntozake Shange, the author contends that the refashioning of the collective cultural self in black drama originates from the complex intersection of three discourses: Eurocentric, Afrocentric, and Post-Afrocentric.
  • Homelands, Harlem and Hollywood: South African Culture and the World Beyond

    Rob Nixon

    Routledge

    1994

    Homelands, Harlem and Hollywood' examines the anti-colonialist struggle against apartheid, and the ways in which American and South African culture have been fascinated with and influenced by one another.

  • London Calling: V.S. Naipaul, Postcolonial Mandarin

    Rob Nixon

    Oxford University Press

    1992

    In contesting orthodox readings of V.S. Naipaul's work, Nixon argues that Naipaul is more than simply an unduly influential writer. He has become a regressive Western institution, articulating a set of values that perpetuates political interests and representational modes that have their origin in the high imperial age.
  • Book Cover for "Penelope's Web"

    Penelope's Web: Gender, Modernity, H.D.'s Fiction

    Susan Stanford Friedman

    Cambridge University Press

    1991

    Penelope's Web should appeal to a wide spectrum of readers interested in twentieth-century modernism, women's writing, feminist criticism, post-structuralist theory, psychoanalysis, autobiography, and women's studies. It is the first book to examine fully the brilliantly innovative prose writings of H.D., the pen-name for Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961), who has been known primarily as a poet.

  • Milton and the Drama of History: Historical Vision, Iconoclasm, and the Literary Imagination

    David Loewenstein

    Cambridge University Press

    1990

    This first book-length study explores the relationship between Milton's vision of history and his literary imagination in the revolutionary prose and great poems. It focuses on Milton as a controversial writer actively engaged in shaping, representing, and participating in the drama of history of his age.

  • Book Cover for "Wordsworth's Revisionary Aesthetics"

    Wordsworth's Revisionary Aesthetics

    Theresa Kelley

    Cambridge University Press

    1988

    This book offers a fresh understanding of the role of aesthetics in Wordsworth's major poetry and prose. Professor Kelley proposes aesthetic and geological precedents for this aesthetic model and evaluates its differences from the models developed by Burke, Kant and Hegel.

  • Book Cover for "Re-Making It New"

    Re-Making It New: Contemporary American Poetry and the Modernist Tradition

    Lynn Keller

    Cambridge University Press

    1987

    As a tradition modernism has fostered particularly polarised impulses - though the great modernist poems offer impressive models, modernist principles, epitomised in Ezra Pound's exhortation to 'make it new', encourage poets to reject the methods of their immediate predecessors. Re-making it New explores the impact of this polarised tradition on contemporary American poets by examining the careers of John Ashbery, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Creeley and James Merrill.

  • The Representation of Self in the American Renaissance

    Jeffrey Steele

    University of North Carolina Press

    1987

    "The most thorough and wide-ranging examination we have of the major writing of the period of the American Renaissance in the light of modern psychological theory and criticism. An important book." Robert D. Richardson, Jr. University of Denver

  • Book Cover for "Psyche Reborn"

    Psyche Reborn: The Emergence of H.D.

    Susan Stanford Friedman

    Indiana University Press

    1981

Essay Collections

  • The Oxford Handbook of Nineteenth-Century American Literature

    Russ Castronovo, Ed.

    Oxford University Press

    2012

    How do we approach the rich field of nineteenth-century American literature? How might we recalibrate the coordinates of critical vision and open up new areas of investigation? To answer such questions, this volume brings together 23 original essays written by leading scholars in American literary studies. 

  • Narrative Middles: Navigating the Nineteenth-Century Novel

    Caroline Levine & Mario Ortiz-Robles, Eds.

    Ohio State University Press

    2011

    In this groundbreaking collection of essays, Narrative Middles: Navigating the Nineteenth-Century British Novel, nine literary scholars offer innovative approaches to the study of the underrepresented middle of the vast, bulky nineteenth-century multiplot novel. 

  • The African Diaspora and the Disciplines

    Tejumola Olaniyan & James H. Sweet, Eds.

    Indiana University Press

    2010

    Focusing on the problems and conflicts of doing African diaspora research from various disciplinary perspectives, these essays situate, describe, and reflect on the current practice of diaspora scholarship. Tejumola Olaniyan, James H. Sweet, and the international group of contributors assembled here seek to enlarge understanding of how the diaspora is conceived and explore possibilities for the future of its study.
  • Contesting Performance: Global Sites of Research

    Jon McKenzie, Heike Roms & C.J.W.-L. Lee, Eds.

    Palgrave Macmillan

    2010

    Contesting Performance is a landmark collection of essays by international scholars that addresses the global development of performance research in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.
  • Text and Meaning: Literary Discourse and Beyond

    Richard Begam & Dieter Stein, Eds.

    Düsseldorf University Press

    2010

    In the aftermath of the "Theory Wars" of the late twentieth century, this collection reconsiders two of the most fundamental questions of interpretation: where do we locate the material, linguistic and cultural boundaries of a text and what role is played in the establishment of meaning by intention, production and reception? Topics covered include British, German, and American literature, the visual arts, philosophy and linguistics.

  • Immanuel Wallerstein and the Problem of the World: System, Scale, Culture

    Nirvana Tanoukhi, David Palumbo-Liu & Bruce Robbins, Eds.

    Duke University Press

    2010

    In this collection of essays, leading cultural theorists consider the meaning and implications of world-scale humanist scholarship by engaging with Immanuel Wallerstein’s world-systems analysis. The renowned sociologist developed his influential critical framework to explain the historical and continuing exploitation of the rest of the world by the West.

  • Book Cover for "Victorian Vulgarity"

    Victorian Vulgarity: Taste in Verbal and Visual Culture

    Susan David Bernstein & Elsie B. Michie, Eds.

    Ashgate

    2009

    Originally describing language use and class position, vulgarity became, over the course of the nineteenth century, a word with wider social implications. Variously associated with behavior, the possession of wealth, different races, sexuality and gender, the objects displayed in homes, and ways of thinking and feeling, vulgarity suggested matters of style, taste, and comportment.

  • Book Cover for "Lydgate Matters"

    Lydgate Matters: Poetry and Material Culture in the Fifteenth Century

    Lisa Cooper & Andrea Denny-Brown, Eds.

    Palgrave Macmillan

    2008

    This collection re-evaluates the work of fifteenth-century poet John Lydgate in light of medieval material culture. Top scholars in the field unite here with critical newcomers to offer fresh perspectives on the function of poetry on the cusp of the modern age, and in particular on the way that poetry speaks to the heightened relevance of material goods and possessions to the formation of late medieval identity and literary taste.

  • Early Modern Nationalism and Milton's England

    David Loewenstein & Paul Stevens, Eds.

    University of Toronto Press

    2008

    Although the poet John Milton was a politically active citizen and polemicist during the English Revolution, little has been written on Milton's concept of nationalism. Early Modern Nationalism and Milton's England features fifteen essays by leading international scholars who illuminate the significance of the nation as a powerful imaginative construct in his writings.

  • African Literature: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory

    Tejumola Olaniyan & Ato Quayson, Eds.

    Blackwell

    2007

    This is the first anthology to bring together the key texts of African literary theory and criticism.
  • Modernism and Colonialism: British and Irish Literature, 1899-1939

    Richard Begam & Michael Valdez Moses, Eds.

    Duke University Press

    2007

    This collection of essays by renowned literary scholars offers a sustained and comprehensive account of the relation of British and Irish literary modernism to colonialism. Bringing postcolonial studies into dialogue with modernist studies, the contributors move beyond depoliticized appreciations of modernist aesthetics as well as the dismissal of literary modernism as irredeemably complicit in the evils of colonialism.

  • Heresy, Literature, and Politics in Early Modern English Culture

    David Loewenstein & John Marshall, Eds.

    Cambridge University Press

    2006

    This interdisciplinary volume of essays examines the changing conceptions, character and condemnation of 'heresy' in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. Offering fresh perspectives on John Milton, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and others, this volume will interest all literary, religious, and political historians working on early modern English culture.

  • African Drama and Performance

    Tejumola Olaniyan & John Conteh-Morgan, Eds.

    Indiana University Press

    2004

    African Drama and Performance is a collection of innovative and wide-ranging essays that bring conceptually fresh perspectives, from both renowned and emerging voices, to the study of drama, theatre, and performance in Africa. Topics range from studies of major dramatic authors and formal literary dramas to improvisational theatre and popular video films.
  • Book Cover for "Materializing Democracy"

    Materializing Democracy: Toward a Revitalized Cultural Politics

    Russ Castronovo & Dana Nelson, Eds.

    2002

    For the most part, democracy is simply presumed to exist in the United States. It is viewed as a completed project rather than as a goal to be achieved. Fifteen leading scholars challenge that stasis in Materializing Democracy. They aim to reinvigorate the idea of democracy by placing it in the midst of a contentious political and cultural fray, which, the volume’s editors argue, is exactly where it belongs.

  • The Cambridge History of Early Modern English Literature

    David Loewenstein & Janel Mueller, Eds.

    Cambridge University Press

    2002

    This is a comprehensive history of English literature written in Britain between the Reformation and the Restoration. While it focuses on England, literary effort in Scotland and Ireland is also covered, with occasional references to Wales and Ireland. This literary history by an international team of scholars is essential reading for students and scholars of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature, culture, and history. 

  • From Author to Text: Re-reading George Eliot’s Romola

    Caroline Levine & Mark W. Turner, Eds.

    Ashgate Press

    1998

  • Dangerous Liaisons: Gender, Nation, and Postcolonial Perspectives

    Anne McClintock, Ed.

    University of Minnesota Press

    1997

    The first collection to emphasize the complex interaction between gender and postcoloniality. In this essential volume, eminent contributors address the issues raised by the postcolonial condition, considering nationhood, history, gender, and identity from an interdisciplinary perspective.
  • The Emergence of Quaker Writing: Dissenting Literature in Seventeenth-Century England

    David Loewenstein & Thomas N. Corns, Eds.

    Routledge

    1996

    This collection of new essays by literary scholars and historians looks at the diversity of seventeenth-century Quaker writing, examining its rhetoric, its polemical strategies, its purposeful use of the print medium, and the heroism and vehemence of its world vision.

  • Book Cover for "Romantic Women Writers"

    Romantic Women Writers: Voices and Countervoices

    Theresa Kelley & Paula Feldman, Eds.

    University Press of New England

    1995

    This collection of essays forges a new definition of Romanticism that includes the wide range of women's artistic expression.

  • Book Cover for "Feminist Measures"

    Feminist Measures: Soundings in Poetry and Theory

    Lynn Keller & Cristanne Miller, Eds.

    University of Michigan Press

    1994

    Feminist Measures: Soundings in Poetry and Theory breaks new ground in postmodern literary theory, including feminist theory, by moving the focus away from narrative fiction and onto poetry. The book responds to the need for more adequately theorized approaches to poetic literature by bringing together new, previously unpublished essays by fourteen accomplished critics.

  • Book Cover for "Joyce: The Return of the Repressed"

    Joyce: The Return of the Repressed

    Susan Stanford Friedman, Ed.

    Cornell University Press

    1992

    Did James Joyce, that icon of modernity, spearhead the dismantling of the Cartesian subject? Or was he a supreme example of a modern man forever divided and never fully known to himself? This volume reads the dialogue of contradictory cultural voices in Joyce's works--revolutionary and reactionary, critical and subject to critique, marginal and central.

  • Book Cover for "Signets"

    Signets: Reading H.D.

    Susan Stanford Friedman & Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Eds.

    University of Wisconsin Press

    1991

    Signets is an essential resource for those interested in H. D., modernism, and feminist criticism and writing that brings together the best essays of H.D. (Hilda Doolittle). Susan Stanford Friedman and Rachel Blau DuPlessis have gathered the most influential and generative studies of H. D.’s work and complemented them with photobiographical, chronological, and bibliographical portraits unique to this volume.

  • Politics, Poetics, and Hermeneutics in Milton's Prose

    David Loewenstein & James Grantham Turner, Eds.

    Cambridge University Press

    1990

    In this book, some of the most eminent critics of seventeenth-century literature and some of the liveliest younger scholars explore the interconnections among Milton's politics, poetics, and prose writings. While the essays focus on Milton's prose, they open up new perspectives on his major poems and on seventeenth-century ideologies, theologies, and interpretive practices.

Edited Editions

  • Book Cover for "John Milton, Prose"

    John Milton, Prose: Major Writings on Liberty, Politics, Religion, and Education

    David Loewenstein, Ed.

    Wiley-Blackwell

    2013

    Regarded by many as the equal of Shakespeare in poetic imagination and expression, Milton was also a prolific writer of prose, applying his potent genius to major issues of domestic, religious and political liberty. This superbly annotated new publication is the most authoritative single-volume anthology yet of Milton's major prose works.

  • Norton Anthology of World Literature (3rd Edition)

    Caroline Levine, Ed.

    W.W. Norton and Co.

    2012

    A classic, reimagined.

    Read by millions of students since its first publication, The Norton Anthology of World Literature remains the most-trusted anthology of world literature available.

  • Book Cover for "The Scent of the Gods"

    The Scent of the Gods, by Fiona Cheong

    Leslie Bow, Ed.

    University of Illinois Press

    2010

    The Scent of the Gods tells the enchanting, haunting story of a young girl's coming of age in Singapore during the tumultuous years of its formation as a nation. Eleven-year-old Su Yen bears witness to the secretive lives of "grown-ups" in her diasporic Chinese family and to the veiled threats in Southeast Asia during the Cold War years. From a child's limited perspective, the novel depicts the emerging awareness of sexuality in both its beauty and its consequences, especially for women.

  • Book Cover for "The Tragedy of Mariam"

    The Tragedy of Mariam, by Elizabeth Cary

    Karen Britland, Ed.

    Methuen Drama

    2010

    The Tragedy of Mariam, the Fair Queen of Jewry is a Jacobean play written by Elizabeth Tanfield Cary. First published in 1613, it was the first original tragedy written in English by a woman. Never performed during Cary's lifetime, and perhaps not intended for performance, it tells the story of Mariam, the second wife of King Herod. This new edition is accessible for students and contains an up-to-date introduction that discusses the current state of scholarship on the play.

  • The Complete Works of Gerrard Winstanley

    David Loewenstein, Thomas N. Corns & Ann Hughes, Eds.

    Oxford University Press

    2009

    This is the first edition of the complete works of Gerrard Winstanley (1609-76), the foremost radical English thinker and activist of the English Revolution. It is the only edition to observe the standards of modern scholarly editing. The editorial team combines the expertise of acclaimed prize-winning literary scholars and a leading historian of seventeenth-century England.

  • Comedy: American Style, by Jessie Redmon Fauset

    Cherene Sherrard-Johnson, Ed.

    Rutgers University Press

    2009

    Comedy: American Style, Jessie Redmon Fauset’s fourth and final novel, recounts the tragic tale of a family’s destruction—the story of a mother who denies her clan its heritage. Originally published in 1933, this intense narrative stands the test of time and continues to raise compelling, disturbing, and still contemporary themes of color prejudice and racial self-hatred.

  • Book Cover for "Reuben Sachs"

    Reuben Sachs, by Amy Levy

    Susan David Bernstein, Ed.

    Broadview Press

    2006

    Reuben Sachs, the story of an extended Anglo-Jewish family in London, focuses on the relationship between two cousins, Reuben Sachs and Judith Quixano, and the tensions between their Jewish identities and English society. The novel’s complex and sometimes satirical portrait of Anglo-Jewish life, which was in part a reaction to George Eliot’s romanticized view of Victorian Jews in Daniel Deronda, caused controversy on its first publication. 

  • Book Cover for "Romance of a Shop"

    The Romance of a Shop, by Amy Levy

    Susan David Bernstein, Ed.

    Broadview Press

    2006

    The Romance of a Shop is an early "New Woman" novel about four sisters, who decide to establish their own photography business and their own home in central London after their father's death and their loss of financial security. In this novel, Amy Levy examines both the opportunities and dangers of urban experience for women in the late nineteenth century who pursue independent work rather than follow the established paths of domestic service.

  • Book Cover for "Analyzing Freud"

    Analyzing Freud: Letters of H.D., Bryher, and Their Circle

    Susan Stanford Friedman, Ed.

    New Directions

    2001

    Breezy, informal, irreverent, vibrant in detail, H.D.'s letters to her companion, Bryher, revolve around her 1933-1934 therapy sessions with Sigmund Freud, from which she emerged reborn. "A correspondence that tells us more about Freud as a clinician than any other source" (PsyArt), this volume includes H.D.'s and Bryher's letters, as well as letters by Freud to H.D. and Bryher, most of them published here for the first time.

  • The Children of Athena: Athenian Ideas About Citizenship and the Division Between the Sexes, by Nicole Loraux

    Caroline Levine, Trans.

    Princeton University Press

    1994

    In these essays, the renowned French Hellenist Nicole Loraux examines the implication of various Greek origin myths as she explores how Athenians in the fifth century forged and maintained a collective identity.

  • The Essential Margaret Fuller

    Jeffrey Steele, Ed.

    Rutgers University Press

    1993

    The leading feminist intellectual of her day, Margaret Fuller has been remembered for her groundbreaking work, Woman in the Nineteenth Century, which recharted the gender roles of nineteenth-century men and women. In this new collection, the full range of her literary career is represented from her earliest poetry to her final dispatch from revolutionary Italy.

  • Paradise Lost, by John Milton

    David Loewenstein, Ed.

    Cambridge University Press

    1993

    Offering a stimulating introduction to one of the most influential texts of Western literature, this book highlights Milton's imaginative daring, in considering the heretical dimensions of Paradise Lost and its theology. It situates Milton's great poem in its literary, religious, and political contexts and includes an extremely useful and newly updated guide to further reading.