Books by PhD Alumni

  • Literacy, Economy, and Power

    Christoph, Julie; John M. Duffy; Eli Goldblatt; Nelson Graff; Rebecca S. Nowacek, and Bryan Trabold, editors

    Southern Illinois University Press

    2013

    This volume follows on the groundbreaking contributions of celebrated UW-Madison English Department professor emerita Deborah Brandt’s Literacy in American Lives—a literacy ethnography exploring how ordinary Americans have been affected by changes in literacy, public education, and structures of power.
  • Towards a Rhetoric of Everyday Life: New Directions in Research on Writing, Text, and Discourse

    Duffy, John M. and Martin Nystrand, editors

    University of Wisconsin Press

    2003

    Rhetoric has traditionally studied acts of persuasion in the affairs of government and men, but this book investigates the language of other, nontraditional rhetors, including immigrants, women, urban children, and others who have long been on the margins of civic life and political forums.
  • Writing from These Roots: Literacy in a Hmong-American Community

    Duffy, John M.

    University of Hawaii Press

    2007

    Winner of the Outstanding Book Award from the Conference of College Composition and Communication, this book documents the historical development of literacy in a Midwestern American community of Laotian Hmong, a people who came to the United States as refugees from the Vietnam War and whose language had no widely accepted written form until one created by missionary-linguists was adopted in the late twentieth century by Hmong in Laos and, later, the U.S. and other Western nations.
  • Woolf & the City: Selected Papers from the Nineteenth Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf

    Evans, Elizabeth F., co-editor

    Clemson UP

    2010

    Woolf and the City collects important essays selected from the nearly 200 papers delivered at the nineteenth annual international conference on Virginia Woolf. The volume includes an introduction by the editors, the conference keynote addresses, and twenty-five essays organized around six presiding themes: Navigating London; Spatial Perceptions and the Cityscape; Regarding Others; The Literary Public Sphere; Border Crossings and Liminal Landscapes; and Teaching Woolf, Woolf Teaching.
  • A Necessary Luxury: Tea in Victorian England

    Fromer, Julie E.

    Ohio UP

    2009

    Tea drinking in Victorian England was a pervasive activity that, when seen through the lens of a century’s perspective, presents a unique overview of Victorian culture. Tea was a necessity and a luxury; it was seen as masculine as well as feminine; it symbolized the exotic and the domestic; and it represented both moderation and excess.
  • Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England

    Gates, Jay Paul, co-editor

    Boydell & Brewer

    2014

    Anglo-Saxon authorities often punished lawbreakers with harsh corporal penalties, such as execution, mutilation and imprisonment. Despite their severity, however, these penalties were not arbitrary exercises of power. Rather, they were informed by nuanced philosophies of punishment which sought to resolve conflict, keep the peace and enforce Christian morality.
  • Because We Live Here: Sponsoring Literacy beyond the College Curriculum

    Goldblatt, Eli

    Hampton Press

    2007

    Winner of the Best Book of the Year from the Council of Writing Program Administrators, Because We Live Here offers a new vision of post-secondary writing programs using the example of the Temple University writing program in Philadelphia. In successive chapters on Temple's connections with schools, community colleges, and university-community partnerships, the author calls for literacy instruction embedded in mutual relationships among an array of institutions and across many levels.
  • Writing Home: A Literacy Autobiography

    Goldblatt, Eli

    Southern Illinois University Press

    2012

    In this engrossing memoir, poet and literacy scholar Eli Goldblatt shares the intimate ways reading and writing influenced the first thirty years of his life—in the classroom but mostly outside it. Writing Home: A Literacy Autobiography traces Goldblatt’s search for home and his growing recognition that only through his writing life can he fully contextualize the world he inhabits.
  • Confluences: Postcolonialism, African American Literary Studies, and the Black Atlantic

    Gruesser, John Cullen

    The University of Georgia Press

    2005

    Confluences looks at the prospects for and the potential rewards of breaking down theoretical and disciplinary barriers that have tended to separate African American and postcolonial studies. John Cullen Gruesser’s study emphasizes the confluences among three major theories that have emerged in literary and cultural studies in the past twenty-five years: postcolonialism, Henry Louis Gates Jr.’s Signifyin(g), and Paul Gilroy’s black Atlantic.
  • The Empire Abroad and the Empire at Home: African American Literature and the Era of Overseas Expansion

    Gruesser, John Cullen

    The University of Georgia Press

    2012

    In The Empire Abroad and the Empire at Home, John Cullen Gruesser establishes that African American writers at the turn of the twentieth century responded extensively and idiosyncratically to overseas expansion and its implications for domestic race relations. He contends that the work of these writers significantly informs not only African American literary studies but also U.S. political history.
  • Race, Gender and Empire in American Detective Fiction

    Gruesser, John Cullen

    McFarland

    2013

    This book highlights detection’s malleability by analyzing the works of particular groups of authors from specific time periods written in response to other texts.
  • Social Actions for Classroom Language Learning

    Hellermann, J.

    Multilingual Matters

    2008

    Drawing on recent socio-cultural approaches to research on language learning and an extensive corpus of classroom video recording made over four years, the book documents language learning as an epiphenomenon of peer face-to-face interaction. Advanced technology for recording classroom interaction (6 cameras per classroom) allows the research to move the focus for analysis off the teacher and onto learners as they engage in dyadic interaction.
  • The Development of Interactional Competence

    Hellermann, J., co-editor

    Multilingual Matters

    2011

    Drawing on data from a range of contexts and a range of languages including English, German, French, Danish and Icelandic, the studies in this volume address challenges suggested by these questions: What kinds of interactional resources do L2 users draw on to participate competently and creatively in their L2 encounters? And how useful is conversation analysis in capturing the specific development of individuals’ interactional competencies in specific practices across time?
  • How to Be South Asian in America: Narratives of Ambivalence and Belonging

    jain, anupama

    Temple UP

    2011

    Providing a useful analysis of and framework for understanding immigration and assimilation narratives, anupama jain's How to Be South Asian in America considers the myth of the American Dream in fiction (Meena Alexander's Manhattan Music), film (American Desi, American Chai), and personal testimonies.
  • Architectural Identities: Domesticity, Literature, and the Victorian Middle Class

    Kaston Tange, Andrea

    University of Toronto Press

    2010

    Architectural Identities links Victorian constructions of middle-class identity with domestic architecture. In close readings of a wide range of texts, including fiction, autobiography, housekeeping manuals, architectural guides and floor plans, Andrea Kaston Tange argues that the tensions at the root of middle-class self-definition were built into the very homes that people occupied.
  • African, Native, and Jewish American Literature and the Reshaping of Modernism

    Kent, Alicia A.

    Palgrave Macmillan

    2007

    What does the modern era look like to those labeled “not modern” or “traditional”? Refuting claims that their art was “old world” and “primitive,” Kent argues that African, Native, and Jewish American writers in the early twentieth century instead developed experimental strategies of self-representation that reshaped the very form of the novel itself.
  • Stephen Vincent Benet: Essays on His Life and Work

    Konkle, Lincoln, co-editor

    McFarland & Co., Inc.

    2003

    When Stephen Vincent Benét died in 1943 at the age of 44, all of America mourned the loss. Benét was one of the country’s most well known poets of the first half of the twentieth century and as a fiction writer, he had an even larger audience.This book is a collection of essays celebrating Benét and his writing.
  • Thornton Wilder and The Puritan Narrative Tradition

    Konkle, Lincoln

    University of Missouri Press

    2006

    This is the first reading of Wilder’s life, fiction, drama, and criticism as a product of American culture. Early American studies by Sacvan Bercovitch, Mason Lowance Jr., Emory Elliott, and others have identified aspects of the American literary tradition stemming from New England Puritan writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Konkle extends the argument for continuity into both the twentieth century and the profane space of the theater.
  • Thornton Wilder: New Perspectives

    Konkle, Lincoln, co-editor

    Northwestern University Press

    2013

    The essays in Thornton Wilder: New Perspectives constitute a comprehensive critical reassessment at a time of renewed interest in the writer. Wilder is best known for Our Town and The Bridge of San Luis Rey, both winners of a Pulitzer Prize, making Wilder still the only writer to be so honored for both drama and fiction. His other fiction, in particular, is far less familiar to a wider readership.
  • Framed: The New Woman Criminal in British Culture at the Fin de Siècle

    Miller, Elizabeth C.

    University of Michigan Press

    2008

    Framed uses fin de siècle British crime narrative to pose a highly interesting question: why do female criminal characters tend to be alluring and appealing while fictional male criminals of the era are unsympathetic or even grotesque?
  • Slow Print: Literary Radicalism and Late Victorian Print Culture

    Miller, Elizabeth C.

    Stanford UP

    2013

    This book explores the literary culture of Britain's radical press from 1880 to 1910, a time that saw a flourishing of radical political activity as well as the emergence of a mass print industry. While Enlightenment radicals and their heirs had seen free print as an agent of revolutionary transformation, socialist, anarchist and other radicals of this later period suspected that a mass public could not exist outside the capitalist system.
  • Unriddling the Exeter Riddles

    Murphy, Patrick J.

    Penn State UP

    2011

    The vibrant and enigmatic Exeter Riddles (ca. 960–980) are among the most compelling texts in the field of medieval studies, in part because they lack textually supplied solutions. Modern scholars have responded enthusiastically to the challenge of solving the Riddles, but have generally examined them individually. Few have considered the collection as a whole or in a broader context.
  • Agents of Integration: Understanding Transfer as a Rhetorical Act (Studies in Writing and Rhetoric)

    Nowacek, Rebecca S.

    Southern Illinois University Press

    2011

    The question of how students transfer knowledge is an important one, as it addresses the larger issue of the educational experience. In Agents of Integration: Understanding Transfer as a Rhetorical Act, Rebecca S. Nowacek explores, through a series of case studies, the issue of transfer by asking what in an educational setting engages students to become “agents of integration”— individuals actively working to perceive, as well as to convey effectively to others, the connections they make.
  • Worm Work: Recasting Romanticism

    Schwartz, Janelle A.

    University of Minnesota Press

    2012

    Rehabilitating the lowly worm into a powerful aesthetic trope, Janelle A. Schwartz proposes a framework for understanding such a strangely animate nature.
  • The Literature of Exhaustion: Borges, Nabokov and Barth

    Stark, Jack

    Duke University Press

    1974

  • The Politics of Irony in American Modernism

    Stratton, Matthew

    Fordham University Press

    2013

    This book shows how American literary culture in the first half of the twentieth century saw “irony” emerge as a term to describe intersections between aesthetic and political practices. Against conventional associations of irony with political withdrawal, Stratton shows how the term circulated widely in literary and popular culture to describe politically engaged forms of writing.
  • Empowerment on an Unstable Planet: From Seeds of Human Energy to a Scale of Global Change

    Taylor, Jesse O., with Daniel C. Taylor and Carl E. Taylor

    Oxford UP

    2011

    • Advances a theory of social change based on human energy rather than economics.
  • A Critical Biography of Lady Jane Wilde, 1821?-1896 Irish Revolutionist, Humanist, Scholar and Poet

    Tipper, Karen S.

    Edwin Mellen Press

    2002

    The focus of this study is upon a progressive women whose broad erudition allowed her to write on a great variety of subjects. Her own life as a revolutionist and writer, and her writings about women will interest those in women’s studies. As an Irish nationalist in a movement that had considerable influence on subsequent nationalist leaders like Arthur Griffin, her views in her revolutionary poems and articles are still pertinent.
  • Approaches to Teaching Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and Other Works

    Wilson, Sharon Rose, co-editor

    MLA

    1996

    Margaret Atwood's works, especially The Handmaid's Tale, are widely taught not only in literature courses but also in economics, political science, sociology, film, and business courses. Her writings span a variety of genres and address such themes as identity, Canadian nationalism, struggle for survival, sexual politics, and shamanism; this rich and diverse range has proved fertile ground for teachers and critics alike.
  • Margaret Atwood's Fairy-Tale Sexual Politics

    Wilson, Sharon Rose

    University Press of Mississippi

    1993

    Sharon Rose Wilson's analysis of Margaret Atwood's sexual politics through a study of fairy-tale patterns offers a new reading of Atwood and a fresh appreciation of the traditional fairy tale's ability to illuminate modern literature. Not only is this the first study to explore systematically Atwood's fiction and poetry through fairy-tale images, but also it occasions the first time Atwood has allowed examples of her artwork to be published in a book.
  • Margaret Atwood: Textual Assassinations: Recent Poetry and Fiction

    Wilson, Sharon Rose, ed.

    Ohio State University Press

    2003

    Margaret Atwood's Textual Assassinations is an edited collection of scholarly essays that concentrate on the recent work—poetry and fiction—of renowned Canadian author Margaret Atwood. The contributors concentrate on the postmodern and postcolonial techniques Atwood marshals in this body of work—the “textual assassinations” of the title—and also the writings in their Canadian cultural context.
  • Myths and Fairy Tales in Contemporary Women's Fiction

    Wilson, Sharon Rose

    Palgrave Macmillan

    2012

    Myths and Fairy Tales in Contemporary Women's Fiction explores contemporary feminist, postmodernist, and postcolonial women writers’ use and revisions of fairy tales and myths. With close readings of works ranging from Margaret Atwood to Doris Lessing to Toni Morrison, Wilson examines meanings of myths and fairy tales as well as their varying techniques, images, intertexts, and genres.
  • Women's Utopian and Dystopian Fiction

    Wilson, Sharon Rose

    Cambridge Scholars

    2013

    Women’s Utopian and Dystopian Fiction explores the genres of utopian and dystopian recent fiction. It is about how this literature of both imagined perfection and disaster creates new worlds and critiques gender roles, traditions, and values. Essays range in subject matter from Charlotte Perkins Gilman, P. D. James, Joanna Russ, and Marge Piercy, to Ursula Le Guin, Fay Weldon, and Toni Morrison.
  • Bloomsbury, Modernism, and the Reinvention of Intimacy

    Wolfe, Jesse

    Cambridge UP

    2011

    Bloomsbury, Modernism, and the Reinvention of Intimacy integrates the studies of three 'inner circle' members of the Bloomsbury group and three 'satellite' figures into a rich narrative of early twentieth-century culture. Wolfe shows how numerous modernist writers felt torn.
  • Breaking Frame: Technology and the Visual Arts in the Nineteenth Century

    Wosk, Julie

    Rutgers University Press

    1993

    Reissued in 2013 as Breaking Frame: Technology, Art, and Design, this incisive, abundantly illustrated study explores for the first time how the visual arts reflected the explosive psychological impact of the Industrial Revolution on English and American society. Wosk reveals the ways artists and designers responded to the hopes and fears for the first industrial age, and how their work continues to illuminate our own visions of technology and culture.
  • Women and the Machine: Representations From the Spinning Wheel to the Electronic Age

    Wosk, Julie

    The Johns Hopkins University Press

    2003

    From sexist jokes about women drivers to such empowering icons as Amelia Earhart and Rosie the Riveter, representations of the relationship between women and modern technology in visual culture have been both demeaning and celebratory.