ESLAT Dates

For Undergraduate Students

Undergraduates can visit the Testing and Evaluation website for more information about how to complete their required placement tests. If you have difficulties scheduling your ESLAT test, please contact the SOAR Program at soar@studentlife.wisc.edu or 608-262-4707.

For Graduate Students

August 28,  9:00 AM or
August 30,  9:00 AM

Location:
105 Brogden Psychology
Building
Campus Map:
http://map.wisc.edu/


 


 


Placement

ESLAT

The ESLAT (English as a Second Language Assessment Test) is used to assess students' English language skills required for academic work and to place students in appropriate ESL courses. The ESLAT is required of many new graduate and undergraduate students.

The ESLAT consists of two parts.

• Part 1: Listening.This portion of the test assesses your comprehension of informal speech and lectures. The first part is a multiple-choice listening test. You will listen to one-line statements and choose a response or a paraphrase. The test continues with short dialogues or lectures on either general or academic topics.

The listening test is only given as part of the on-campus test. 

• Part 2: Reading & Writing. The second portion of the test requires you to read a 600-800 word passage. You will then summarize the passage and respond to it in a short essay. You will have 50 minutes to complete this section.

Areas of evaluation and the criteria for exemption from ESL and Communication Part A:

Reading ability:

  • Summary reflects clear understanding of the reading
  • Summary conveys the main points of the article’s arguments

Writing ability:

  • Composition adheres to the conventions of academic writing
  • Composition contains no plagiarism; no copying from the article
  • Composition makes use of cohesive devices
  • Paragraphs are well-formed
  • Opinion is organized, reasoned and developed

 Language use:

  • Vocabulary is varied and academic
  • Correct word forms are used
  • Grammar is accurate and does not interfere with meaning
  • Variety of sentence structures is used

There is no practice or sample test available. To prepare yourself, read widely, summarize what you read and write about it. Good writing develops through practice.

If you have questions, please contact the ESL office at askesl@wisc.edu. Students with disabilities needing a reasonable accommodation should contact the McBurney Disability Resource Center